Sleeping in a Tree House in the Dominican Rainforest

My last post chronicled my time in the Dominican Republic and my visit to Dominican Tree House Villages. DTHV is, just as it sounds, a community of tree houses in the Samaná province of the Dominican Republic. Think Swiss Family Robinson, but with electricity. There are no walls, no wifi, and no TV. It is only you and nature. And it is magnificent.

Dominican Tree House Village

Because I arrived at night, I could not appreciate the beauty of DTHV until my first morning there. However, that did not mean my other senses could not enjoy my accommodations. The sounds and smells of the rainforest teased me for what morning had in store.

Dominican Tree House Villiage

Photo Courtesy of Dominican Tree House Village

After a long day of travel, I wanted a shower before unwinding in bed. Because I reserved a VIP room for my first two nights (it was booked for the rest of my stay) I had my own private outdoor shower. It was pitch black outside, but I was determined to take advantage of it. It is a little odd to shower in the dark. It is even odder to shower in the dark, outside, in the jungle.

Dominican Tree House Village

Photo Courtesy of Dominican Tree House Village

While I felt exposed, for lack of a better word, I was actually well hidden from view, especially in the dark of night. While I was shampooing my hair (which responds to humidity about as well as Monica Geller’s), I looked up and saw the familiar sight of Orion’s belt above me in the night’s sky. I don’t think the stars have ever looked more bright and clear than they did at that moment. Even if I did absolutely nothing else on this trip, that view made it all worth it. But, enough about that, back to the tree house.

Dominican Tree House Village

The absence of the sounds I was accustomed to was noticeable. There were no cars, no sirens, no trains, no busy city streets. Each night I drifted off to sleep listening to the sounds of crickets, tree frogs, and tropical birds in a symphonic cacophony of nature.

Dominican Tree House Village

Photo Courtesy of Dominican Tree House Village

Instead of walls, there are giant vibrant red curtains on all of the tree houses. These are more for blocking out light and providing privacy than from shielding you from the elements. But the climate is so perfect that there really isn’t anything to be shielded from. To safeguard you from the insects, each bed comes with a mosquito net. However, I only saw a few bugs on one night of my stay and was never bitten by anything during my time there.

Dominican Tree House Village

Photo Courtesy of Dominican Tree House Village

Both of my rooms were well above the tree line and far away from the other tree houses, so I never closed my curtains and instead opted to be awoken by the rising sun and have an uninterrupted view of the gorgeous sunsets. I should note that this view came with a price: 100 steps up to my VIP room and then 70 steps up to my second “treetop view” room. There were times I contemplated whether the walk to my tree house might actually kill me.

Dominican Tree House Village

Photo Courtesy of Dominican Tree House Village

Throughout the day and night, heavy, but short, rainstorms pass through the area. You know, because it is the rainforest. The storms provided a soothing sonic backdrop that Sharper Image wishes it could capture for its white noise machines. The rain never lasted long and we usually dried off pretty quickly. I brought my umbrella and rain jacket but never bothered to use them, opting instead to enjoy the refreshing showers.

Dominican Tree House Village

One of the lovely things about DTHV is that it is nestled in Samaná, an area in the northeastern part of the country relatively untouched by tourism or commercialism. There are only a handful of hotels and few tourists. Therefore, you really get to experience the culture and people of the Dominican Republic, unlike in resort towns like Punta Cana.

Dominican Tree House Village

When it comes down to it, I am doing a rather poor job of capturing the uniqueness and beauty of both Samaná and the DTHV. To say my experience there was anything other than life changing would be a serious understatement. While I have gone glamping before, I can honestly say my time at DTHV was a once-in-a-lifetime experience. I now hope to have at least one vacation a year where I can completely disconnect and immerse myself in nature. Perhaps Giraffe Manor in Kenya will be next.

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I actually feel that, in my short time there, it has already affected my personality and preferences. Upon my return from the rainforest, the hustle and bustle of the airport (especially after I returned to the United States) was sensory overload. I could not handle all of the sights and sounds around me. I have also found that I do not like having the TV on anymore (though that may fade once all of my favorite shows return later this month). Although, I really hope these changes are not temporary and I can maintain my new low-technology life.

When it comes down to it, if you are looking for an escape, and resort life isn’t for you, I truly suggest slipping away into some relaxation and tree house living at the Dominican Tree House Village.

 

6 Comments on “Sleeping in a Tree House in the Dominican Rainforest

  1. Have you ever considered a silence and solitude retreat in the Arizona or any other desert? There are plenty of spa-type retreat centers near and in Sedona. I myself like to make retreats at the Desert House of Prayer near Tucson. You don’t have to take part in any praying or church services, to stay there.

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