An Unplanned Night of Poetry

My five week hiatus from law firm life has ended and I have finally settled into my new job. I’ve made it through the first few weeks, and so far life is wonderful. I am working approximately 30-40 hours a week less than at my old firm, and I have filled that extra time with seeing my friends and actually taking care of myself. Oddly enough, all the free time for long hikes, trivia nights, dinners, and hot yoga sessions have put doing new things (or at least writing about them) on the back burner.

On one of my nights out, my friend Katie, who I hadn’t seen since law school, and I headed out to catch up over a drink. At the bar we started to chat with a gentleman named Adam seated next to us. We went through the general getting to know you topics: where are you from, what are you doing in town, how do you feel about the first few weeks of the Trump administration, etc.

We learned that he was in town for a poetry reading as part of Nashville’s First Saturday art crawl. I told him that going to a poetry reading was on my list of New Things to do, and we promptly invited ourselves along.

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The reading was held at Sauvage Galerie, a bizarre little gallery in a residential neighborhood in South Nashville. The room was tiny, and the art consisted of mixed medium design, which I am pretty certain was just trash glued to wood and I think one piece was just part of a mop. Ron Swanson would not approve. I respect what the artist was going for, but I was not hip enough to get it.

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The three poets for the evening were J. Joseph Kane, Robyn Leigh Lear, and Adam Day. Poetry has never really been my thing. I love novels, biographies, and Buzzfeed articles about which dog best matches my personality (Great Dane, ironically). That said, I enjoyed the varied expression of the three different poets and I got a lot more out of it than I would just reading words on a page. I would totally go to another reading in the future . . . but I still don’t see myself ever reading poetry for fun.

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I promise more interesting and exciting posts are heading your way. First I just have to get used to actually having a life again first. More adventures are to come!

Absinthe: Sampling the Green Fairy

Absinthe rose to popularity in the late 19th/early 20th centuries and was fashionable among the literati of Paris. Some famous fans of the drink include Ernest Hemingway, James Joyce, Pablo Picasso, Vincent van Gogh, Oscar Wilde, and my hometown favorite, Edgar Allan Poe. Absinthe was outlawed in the United States in 1915, but since the ban was lifted in 2007, it has experienced a resurgence. While Absinthe has a reputation for being a hallucinogenic, that label is is merely a result of legend and exaggeration. Sorry.

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Despite my past travels to Europe, I had never had an authentic glass of absinthe. So, I thought that it would the perfect thing to help me unwind during a little après–ski. My friends Lilas and Chris joined me in a visit to The Absinthe Bar in Breckenridge, which boasts the largest selection of absinthe in the United States.

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The menu had 19 types of absinthe from France, Switzerland, the Czech Republic, Austria, and the USA. I selected Pernod absinthe, a French absinthe often written about by Hemingway, which is from the original producer of commercial absinthe and has a high alcohol content and a heavy anise flavor profile. It is made using the same ingredients as in the early 1800s.

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There are a few processes through which absinthe can be made. One method, which my bartender used, is classic French absinthe ritual. The ritual involves placing a sugar cube on top of a perforated spoon, which rests on the rim of the specially designed absinthe glass. Ice water is then dripped on the sugar cube, which dissolves into the absinthe. This causes the green transparent liquor to “louche” into an opaque mint green cocktail.

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The result was a fun, cold liquorish-flavored cocktail. The Pernod was slightly bitter, but that was partially offset by the dissolved sugar. While liquorish isn’t my favorite thing in the world, I’d like to sample more because I find the history and process to make absinthe fascinating.

Laughter Yoga: Post-Election Recovery

Well, this has been a hell of a week, hasn’t it? Regardless of your political beliefs, or expected or desired outcome, this election has been tumultuous. Like most of America, I needed a break. In order to inject some joy into my life I reached out to laughter yoga.

Laughter yoga surprisingly has no yoga in it. Instead, laughter yoga is a class that promotes prolonged voluntary laughter. Laughter yoga was developed by the Indian physician Madan Kataria and is based on the belief that voluntary laughter provides the same physiological and psychological benefits as spontaneous laughter.  Some studies have indicated that laughter yoga can reduce pain, stress, and blood sugar, and can help with short-term memory. I can’t speak to the validity of these studies, but I can say that it lifted my spirits.

Our class was filled with silly laughter. It was like improv combined with children’s playtime. We started with pretending to be squirrels, running around eating imaginary acorns and giggling wildly. I immediately realized I had no idea what I signed up for. The absurdity continued from there. We were tittering trees, cackling mad scientists, chuckling penguins, and snickering sandpipers running into the ocean waves. We also tossed around an imaginary ball, that would send the person who caught it into a fit of laughter. The goofiness of the class meant that I did not need to force my laughter. It was real and infectious laughter. Each activity is concluded with childlike clapping of your hands and shouting “Very good, very good, yay!”

When I first told friends I planned to go to the class, many said they were not up to it after a very stressful week. However, once I described how fun and uplifting it was (and how they didn’t actually have to do any yoga) many expressed a desire to try it out in the future.

I immersed myself in the class and therefore did not take any photos or videos of my experience. However, if you are interested, here is a sample of what the class was like:

Learning Calligraphy

I have always had terrible handwriting. It is so bad that often even I can’t read it and it prompted someone to once ask, “didn’t anyone teach you to write like a girl?” Given that, I didn’t really expect calligraphy to be my calling, but total lack of skill has never stopped me.

Calligraphy Pen

Calligraphy requires a special pen called an “oblique.” Oblique calligraphy pens are used because they have a protruding flange (the gold piece sticking out on the side) that forces your nib to write at the correct 45-degree angle. A nib, which is inserted at the end of the oblique, is the part of the pen that actually touches the ink to the paper. Every few letters you have to dip the nib in an ink well. It really made me feel for Thomas Jefferson but also made me think that I don’t have enough feathered quills in my life.

Photo by Karen Watson

Photo by Karen Watson

I took a class with Molly Margaret, the owner of Esque Script Calligraphy at Paper and Ink Arts. We had four hours of instruction in which she took the time to demonstrate and let us practice the basic technique and strokes as well as each lowercase and capital letter. It was an incredibly intricate and time consuming process which I found I don’t really have the patience or attention span for.

52 Things 52 Weeks Calligraphy

However, it was an interesting class and I always enjoy exploring a new skill. Molly was kind enough to write out the name of the blog for me since her writing looks significantly better than my initial attempts at calligraphy. Unfortunately, in my rush to run  off to Sunday brunch I smudged the ink before it fully dried. Oops!

Attending a Polo Match

There are many wonderful ways to spend your Sunday afternoon in the South. Personally, I enjoy using my Sundays to watch sports, any sports. The weather is finally starting to cool down, so I decided to take advantage of the two weeks of fall we get here and do my sports watching outside. Apparently, October is the beginning of polo season so this week’s activity basically picked itself.

Polo

Before writing this post I asked a friend if there was anything she wanted to know about polo that I should put in the blog. She asked, “Was Prince William there? I assume it’s a rule that polo can only be played in the presence of royalty.” I responded, “That’s why I was there.”

Polo Match

So, a little bit about polo: There are two types of polo matches, field and arena. Field polo is played on grass and arena polo is played on dirt. Arena polo is played with a small air-filled ball, similar to a small soccer ball. You can see the orange polo ball in bottom left of the next photo. Also, polo is coed, which is pretty darn cool.

Polo Arena

Arena polo is divided into four 7 1/2 periods called chukkers, which give both the players and the horses a break. In fact, the players change horses during each break (hence why there are different horses in each picture).

Polo Riders

There is no net in polo. Instead, the players attempt to hit the ball into painted doors on either side of the field. You can see them below over Gnash’s shoulder. (For some reason the Predators’—Nashville’s hockey team—mascot was there for the game and was hanging out in the crowd.)

Polo Nashville

There are some interesting rules to polo that aren’t really analogous to other sports. Each time a player hits a ball down the field it creates an imaginary line called the “line of the ball” which continues past the ball. The player who hit the ball has the right of way, and the other players cannot cross the line of the ball in front of that player unless it is at a safe speed and distance. The other players run along side of the line.

Polo Horses

The defending player can push the opponent off the line or steal the ball from the opponent. Alternatively, a player can block another player’s swing by using his or her mallet to hook the mallet of the player swinging at the ball. A player can also give an equine hip check as long as it does not endanger the horses or push the horse into the wall.

Horse Polo

It was a great day to watch a polo match. The sun was out and the air was nice and cool. The atmosphere at a match is surprisingly relaxed. Lots of people brought chairs and blankets to sit on to watch the game. There is also beer and wine available to start your Sunday right.

Polo Team

The game itself was really exciting. Nashville played Louisville so there was a hometown team to cheer for. The commentators did a great job of calling the match and explaining the rules of the game. It made it pretty easy for a newbie like me to follow along.

Polo Goal

The seating was really close to the action, just a few feet from the field. In fact, an errant ball or two went flying into the crowd. The match ended up in a tie: 11-11. I was hoping for a Nashville win, but perhaps I’ll have to wait until the next match.

Polo Teams

It is just the start of the polo season so you have plenty of time to get out and enjoy a match before it gets cold. If you live in the Nashville area, the Franklin Polo Academy has matches every weekend this month. It is a lovely way to spend an afternoon!

Dining on Escargot

I was a vegetarian for approximately 15 years. About a year ago I expanded my dietary world to include fish, and now, apparently, I have thrown snails into the mix. When I starting eating fish is was a necessity during a busy trial; lots of long hours and few breaks for food meant I needed an easy way to up my protein intake. I never expected that it would lead to an ever-expanding world of new foods. My friend Tina, who is an endless source of good ideas, suggested I try the dish. We were both in need of a night off so we went to Nashville’s legendary Sperry’s Restaurant for a girls’ night out.

Escargot

Escargot has been served for centuries. We all know it is famous French cuisine, but it was also a delicacy in ancient Rome and may have been a part of the prehistoric diet. Who knew cavemen were so civilized. Believe it or not, it is also pretty healthy. Escargot is extremely high in protein and low in fat. Well, if you don’t count all the butter.

Eating Escargot

The escargot were served in a traditional dish with mushrooms and garlic-herb, seasoned butter. The taste and texture reminded me of a combination of mussels and cooked mushrooms. A squirt of lemon really brought out the flavor. They were chewy, but not tough. And no, they were not slimy or anything else you might expect from a snail.

I never expected that escargot would taste so, well, normal. I am glad I decided to branch out and add something new to my diet. I am all ready for my next trip to Paris.

A Night of Burlesque

What better way to spend Valentine’s weekend than a trip to a burlesque show. (Warning: While this post is safe for work, no promises that the links are. Click at your own risk and enjoyment.) Burlesque is an old school variety show filled with music, bawdy jokes, and sexy stripteases. The City Winery in Nashville is home to Wasabassco Burlesque, which is one of the best burlesque shows in the world. Lucky us!

Vintage Burlesque Costumes

The evening started with a number by the funny and campy host for the evening, GiGi La Femme. After her sassy striptease, she explained to the audience that Tennessee has specific laws regarding how much a performer can show at an establishment that serves alcohol. Essentially, in addition to pasties, women have to cover the “underboob” and “the vortex,” which GiGi LaFemme described as “where the flower meets the goods.” (It’s true, being a lawyer/nerd I looked up the statute when I got home.) This is the buckle of the Bible-belt, so I can’t say I am surprised.

There were 8 stripteases, with each dancer doing 1-2 retro-fabulous songs. The female performers for night were Gidget Bardot, Turvy TrollopDiletta Delight, Marie Merlot, and special guest from NYC, Gal Friday. We also got the added unexpected special treat of some “manlesque” with a performance from Masterblaster. (Yes, Masterblaster had pasties and his underboobs covered as well.)

I don’t know if something can simultaneously be tasteful and crude, but if it is possible, the result would be burlesque. The evening was filled with much tassel twirling and booty bouncing, and it was not for the prudish or faint of heart.

Vintage Burlesque

In addition to being totally jealous of their amazing hair and makeup, there were two things I loved about the evening. One, the dancers came in all shapes and sizes (all of whom were perfect and beautiful), and two, the audience was about 60% women. In fact, the majority of the cat calls came from women. It was definitely an evening of girl power. (Seriously though, Gidget Bardot is also a scientist which is pretty damn cool.)

If you want to enter the world of burlesque, believe it or not you can take lessons! I learned that you can take a variety of awesome burlesque classes at Delinquent Debutantes—which I am sure will be the setting for a future New Thing.

If you want a sample of what to expect, here is GiGi La Femme dancing to Elvis Presley’s “Tying to Get to You.”

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